The material on this site is for financial institutions, professional investors and their professional advisers. It is for information only. Please read our Terms & Conditions, Privacy Policy and Cookies before using this site. Please see our Subscription Terms and Conditions.


All material subject to strictly enforced copyright laws. © 2021 Euromoney, a part of the Euromoney Institutional Investor PLC.
Opinion

Perfumed steamrollers and powerful owls in Westpac bank bill case

owl-eyes-close-up-160x186

One of the lighter elements of the court case between the Australian Securities and Investments Commission and Westpac over alleged rigging of the bank bill swap rate is the bevy of nicknames it has revealed for Westpac’s traders. Some are a bit unimaginative.

Patrick Stokes, a trader, was “The Sheriff.”

Daniel Park, oddly, was “The Bench.”

Colin Roden, among the more feared and influential Westpac traders, turns out to be known as “The Rat”, and someone at Commonwealth Bank, as yet unnamed, is “Powerful Owl.”

But the bar was raised when Sophie Johnston, now in Westpac’s treasury division in London, took the stand, whereupon she was asked why her colleagues call her “The Perfumed Steamroller”.

“I wasn’t making the joke,” she told the federal court in Melbourne. “So I don’t necessarily know what they meant by steamroller.”



We use cookies to provide a personalized site experience.
By continuing to use & browse the site you agree to our Privacy Policy.
I agree