Are stablecoins the reinvention of money?

Are stablecoins the reinvention of money?

By PETER LEE

Even as the most infamous cryptocurrencies crashed this year, new ones were already emerging, designed to peg their value to fiat currencies. The most popular of the so-called stablecoins, Tether, broke its peg to the dollar in October, raising questions over the best design for these instruments and the worry that they may be just the latest crypto fad to sucker in the unwary. But if they succeed, stablecoins could prove a tipping point for broader crypto adoption and the reinvention of money.

Banking merger momentum grows in the Gulf

Banking merger momentum grows in the Gulf

By OLIVIER HOLMEY

The formation of First Abu Dhabi Bank, widely viewed as a success, has sparked a series of merger announcements. Will scale make for better performing banks? And could cross-border mergers in the region finally happen?

Emerging Europe: Sovcombank’s star rises

Emerging Europe: Sovcombank’s star rises

By LUCY FITZGEORGE-PARKER

Five years ago it was a niche player specializing in consumer loans for the elderly – today Sovcombank is one of Russia’s largest privately owned banks, with a clutch of new shareholders from China and the Gulf. What lies behind its remarkable rise?

Monetary policy: Argentina takes its bitter medicine

Monetary policy: Argentina takes its bitter medicine

By ROB DWYER

Another financial crisis has rocked the country. As it slips into what could be a deep recession, time is running out to achieve the recovery that could create the conditions for a pro-market candidate to win next year’s presidential elections.

Argentina: Investment bankers hold their breath

Argentina: Investment bankers hold their breath

By ROB DWYER

When president Macri’s finance team settled with the bond hold-outs and re-opened Argentina to the capital markets, the good times rolled. But following that emerging markets feast came indigestion. Investment bankers in the country face an uncertain future.

A deal slump tests LatAm DCM bankers

A deal slump tests LatAm DCM bankers

By BEN EDWARDS

It was always going to be a tough year for debt capital markets in Latin America. A turbulent election calendar in three of its biggest economies and rising US rates had been expected to dampen issuance volumes. But few anticipated the drop-off would be so severe.

Asset management: Should Europe’s banks buy back into the buy side?

Asset management: Should Europe’s banks buy back into the buy side?

By DOMINIC O’NEILL

Asset management is one of the few opportunities European banks have for growth and good returns, but regulation is challenging the captive market and margins are falling. Can banks build their own versions of the low-cost US fund management firms – or are these few remaining crown jewels heading the same way as their investment banks?

Asia: The strange case of CLSA

Asia: The strange case of CLSA

By CHRIS WRIGHT

Few firms have seen change quite like CLSA. It is now owned by Citic Securities and incorporates the Hong Kong (and international) arm of the mainland business. As such, it is Citic Securities’ international bridgehead to the world.

Banking resolution: BRRD on the run

Banking resolution: BRRD on the run

By LOUISE BOWMAN

Even its main architects admit that Europe’s banking resolution directive is fundamentally flawed – and they are in a desperate race to fix its failure to deal with funding and liquidity crises before the next bank collapse occurs.

MUFG's Nobuyuki Hirano: Japanese banking's greatest hope

MUFG's Nobuyuki Hirano: Japanese banking's greatest hope

By CHRIS WRIGHT

Nobuyuki Hirano is the world’s most recognized and most respected Japanese banker – and the chief executive of MUFG is an articulate voice on the demographic challenges facing Japanese banking and society. He believes he has charted a path through those challenges and is an internationalist in outlook. His aim is to make MUFG the world’s most trusted financial institution. Can he succeed?

MUFG and Morgan Stanley: Inside the special relationship

MUFG and Morgan Stanley: Inside the special relationship

By CHRIS WRIGHT

Cut in the teeth of the financial crisis, MUFG’s stake in Morgan Stanley might well be the best deal of the last 10 years. Much of the success is down to the strong personal relationship between the firms’ leaders.

Taiwan banking: E.Sun aims for the stars

Taiwan banking: E.Sun aims for the stars

By ELLIOT WILSON

It is unusual for a Taiwanese bank: owned by foreign institutional investors rather than bankrolled by a tycoon or controlled by the state, it’s also on a roll, investing heavily in digital and expanding fast around Asia… but can it last?

Indonesia financial inclusion: GoJek’s metal ignition

Indonesia financial inclusion: GoJek’s metal ignition

By CHRIS WRIGHT

GoPay is southeast Asia’s answer to Ant Financial. Its CEO comes with a background in the most micro level of finance: empowering village housewives to buy things to cook with. How will he build a business backed by the biggest names in global private equity?

Regulation: Mifid II starts to bite

Regulation: Mifid II starts to bite

By PHILIP MOORE

As Mifid II beds down, its impact on the global fixed income research industry is already being felt. There are clear signs that investors are less reliant on research and are using fewer providers than before. As they start to cut costs to implement their own research budgets, providers must ensure that they are getting good value for money.

fROM THE ARCHIVE

Fintech: Up bit creek

Fintech: Up bit creek

By CHRIS WRIGHT

A bitcoin conference on a Thai beach, part of a cryptocurrency cruise, is quite a thing.

The Euromoney 25

The Euromoney 25

Euromoney assesses the performance of 25 banks from around the world in a new series of progress reports

ESG: the stewardship revolution

ESG: the stewardship revolution

By HELEN AVERY

The 2017 US proxy voting season was historic: the world’s two largest asset managers backed shareholder resolutions on climate-risk disclosure.

Can finance save the world’s vulnerable nations?

Can finance save the world’s vulnerable nations?

By CHRIS WRIGHT

There are so many challenges related to climate change, so many disparate actors required for their remedy and so much money required to do it, that it is tempting to see the whole situation as unfixable.

Making sense of Belt and Road – What it means for banks

Making sense of Belt and Road – What it means for banks

By CHRIS WRIGHT

China’s Belt and Road Initiative is so vast and ambitious it can be difficult to understand how it will all work in practice – what makes a BRI undertaking, how will they be funded, will they be trophy projects or on commercial terms, how are they originated? – so Euromoney spoke to 16 institutions all looking at BRI from their own different perspectives.

Fintech 2016: The fintech revolution gathers momentum

Fintech 2016: The fintech revolution gathers momentum

By PETER LEE

After a record year for fund raising, large fintech companies are now emerging in marketplace lending and payments, with many more newcomers deploying venture capital money raised in $25 million to $50 million chunks to transform capital markets and traditional banking mainstays such as mortgage lending.

BNP Paribas breaks cover as Europe’s best bet

BNP Paribas breaks cover as Europe’s best bet

By MARK BAKER

BNPP’s latest strategic update for its corporate and institutional bank might have fallen short of the expectations of a market now used to the wild lurches of rival European firms, but to dismiss this as mere tinkering would be a mistake.

Barclays' identity crisis

Barclays' identity crisis

By PETER LEE

One year on from its big restructuring announcement, Barclays is still struggling to convince that it has found the right model.

The week Wall Street went into meltdown

The week Wall Street went into meltdown

By PETER LEE

In the week of August 13 participants in the financial markets – credit traders, equity investors, heads of repo desks, hedge fund managers, risk controllers, originators and capital markets bankers, credit strategists, treasurers, chief financial officers – began to lose faith in the financial system itself.

Have Wall Street banks gone subprime at the wrong time?

Have Wall Street banks gone subprime at the wrong time?

By ALEX CHAMBERS

Wall Street is praying that the US economy will land softly now that the Federal Reserve has pricked the housing market bubble, because it will be bad news for mortgage origination if house prices stall for long or, even worse, fall.