Singapore FX market riding high on world events

Singapore FX market riding high on world events

By PAUL GOLDEN

The southeast Asian FX market is on fire and it is set to get a further boost thanks to a combination of political and economic turbulence, a regulator committed to facilitating infrastructure investment and increased interest from non-bank market makers.

De Ferrari ditches Credit Suisse for AMP – an altogether different job

De Ferrari ditches Credit Suisse for AMP – an altogether different job

By CHRIS WRIGHT

Francesco de Ferrari was running private banking for Asia at Credit Suisse – arguably one of the most important and well-positioned roles in the bank – so why has he given it up to become CEO of beleaguered Australian wealth manager AMP, a place so toxic it lost its chief executive and chairperson within a fortnight in April?

India rides the risks, with elections looming

India rides the risks, with elections looming

By JEREMY WELTMAN

The country is defying global uncertainty and market turmoil in the lead-up to elections in 2019, with the country in a stronger position now to withstand the prospect of BJP falling.

Shahril takes charge of Khazanah

Shahril takes charge of Khazanah

By CHRIS WRIGHT

The choice of Malaysia's Employees Provident Fund as the next head of the country's sovereign wealth fund is intriguing for both institutions

Broken China should scare LatAm

Broken China should scare LatAm

By ROB DWYER

Any slowdown in the economy of the country that consumes so much local output will bring short-term pain and should be a long-term warning.

The future of the RMB: special focus

The future of the RMB: special focus

Euromoney's latest coverage of how Beijing is seeking to globalize the renminbi, through currency swaps and trade-financing facilities; the rise of the offshore bond market; and how fee-hungry banks are salivating at the prospect of the RMB’s growth.

China’s banks to face new NPL hit

China’s banks to face new NPL hit

By CHRIS WRIGHT

A new rule change will require Chinese banks to recognize more loans as impaired, but while big lenders will sail through, there’s trouble at the smaller end of town.